Europe

WWII Adolf Hitler profile suggests 'messiah complex'

Adolf Hitler
The report talks out of Hitler's paranoia and turn to "Jew-phobia" as Germany struggled militarily

Adolf Hitler developed a "messiah complex" during World War II, a newly unveiled report written for wartime British intelligence says.

The report, written in 1942 by Cambridge academic Joseph MacCurdy, said Hitler was turning increasingly to "Jew-phobia" as defeat loomed.

Social scientist Mark Abrams, who worked on the BBC's overseas propaganda analysis unit, commissioned the report.

The report came to light as a result of research into Mr Abrams' work.

"Hitler is caught up in a web of religious delusions," MacCurdy said in the report.

He outlined how Hitler began to focus on the "Jewish poison" as the tide of World War II turned against Germany.

"The Jews are the incarnation of evil, while he is the incarnation of the spirit of good," MacCurdy said.

"He is a god by whose sacrifice victory over evil may be achieved. He does not say this in so many words, but such a system of ideas would rationalise what he does say that is otherwise obscure."

Cambridge historian Scott Anthony came across the report while researching MacCurdy's work.

"MacCurdy recognised that, faced with external failure, the Nazi leader was focusing on a perceived "enemy within" instead - namely, the Jews," Mr Anthony said.

"Given that we now know that the 'final solution' was commencing, this makes for poignant reading."

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